Cooking Measurements

When trying new recipes or adjusting the scale of it, figuring out the cooking measurements and conversions can be particularly tricky. For example, how does a cup translate into a fluid ounce?To make your cooking easier, we have provided a series of tables that break down the conversion factors for a series of measurements. At the end of this article, we have also provided definitions of some measurements that are commonly used and, yet, ambiguous, such as “dash” or “pinch.”

Liquid Measurements

When converting volumes of liquids, use these conversions:

1 tablespoon (tbsp.) =

3 teaspoons (tsp.) =

1/2 fluid ounce (fl. oz.)

1/8 cup (c.) =

2 tablespoons =

1 fluid ounce

1/4 cup =

4 tablespoons =

2 fluid ounces

1/3 cup =

5 1/3 tablespoons =

8/3 fluid ounces

1/2 cup =

8 tablespoons =

4 fluid ounces

3/4 cup =

12 tablespoons =

6 fluid ounces

1 cup =

16 tablespoons =

8 fluid ounces

1 pint =

2 cups =

32 tablespoons

1 quart =

2 pints =

4 cups

1 gallon =

4 quarts =

8 pints

If you need to convert measurements into metric units:

1 teaspoon =

5 milliliters (mL. or ml.)

1 tablespoon =

15 milliliters

1 fluid ounce =

30 milliliters

1 cup =

240 milliliters

1 pint (pt.) =

480 milliliters

1 quart (qt.) =

960 milliliters

1 gallon (gal.) =

3840 milliliters

1 liter (L.) =

1000 milliliters 34 fluid ounces 4.2 cups 2.1 pints 1.06 quarts 0.26 gallons

Measurements of Weight

When measuring dry ingredients, use the following weight measurements:

1 ounce (oz.) =

28 grams (g)

1 pound (lb.) =

16 ounces

1 pound =

454 grams

NOTE: A common mistake is thinking that an ounce is the same as a fluid ounce. While an ounce measures the weight of solid, dry items (such as amounts of fish), the fluid ounce identifies the volume of amounts of liquid (such as fluid ounces of wine).

One-Pound Equivalents

Without a scale, knowing how to translate a one-pound measurement into smaller increments can be especially difficult. Here is a run down of the size of various measurements that are equivalent to one pound:

  • 2 cups butter
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 2/3 cups brown sugar
  • 3 1/2 cups sifted powdered sugar
  • 2 cups milk
  • 9 medium eggs
  • 2 2/3 cups dry oatmeal
  • 1 7/8 cups rice
  • 2 1/3 cups dry beans
  • 2 cups ground, packed meat.

Is it Me, or Is This Really Hot?

Temperature is another issue when it comes to cooking food. Depending on the recipe you are cooking, you may get your temperature readings in either Fahrenheit or Celsius. From Celsius to Fahrenheit:

  1. multiply by 9
  2. divide by 5
  3. add 32.

From Fahrenheit to Celsius:

  1. subtract 32
  2. multiply by 5
  3. divide by 9.

Common Cooking Temperatures

Fahrenheit Celsius

200 ?F =

93 ?C

250 ?F =

121 ?C

300 ?F =

150 ?C

325 ?F =

163 ?C

350 ?F =

177 ?C

375 ?F =

191 ?C

400 ?F =

204 ?C

425 ?F =

218 ?C

450 ?F =

232 ?C

500 ?F =

260 ?C

Definitions for Ambiguous Cooking Measurements

  • a dash or pinch: an amount that is less than 1/8 teaspoon
  • firmly packed: place as much of the ingredient as possible into the measuring device, making sure to press the ingredient into the container to fit as much in as possible
  • heap: piling as much of an ingredient as possible on top of a leveled off measurement.
  • lightly packed: filling a measuring device to the top without any air bubbles but also without packing the ingredient firmly into the device.

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